Currently Offered Courses - Spring 2018

ANTH 101 - Introduction to Anthropology

Anthropology was first envisioned as a holistic discipline, combining insights from the study of human anatomy and evolution, research on material remains of human settlements, and the analysis of social interaction in language and other cultural practices. Following this tradition, this course explores the questions about where humans came from, how societies live and communicate, and why human cultural groups vary. This course can be used to fulfill either Western or non-Western general education categories, but not both.

ANTH 102 - Human Origins and Culture

Introduction to human evolutionary biology focusing on the biological processes responsible for our evolution. Draws on a diverse range of disciplines- evolutionary biology, population genetics, comparative anatomy, primatology, archaeology, geology and paleoecology to provide context for interpreting the fossil and archaeological evidence for humans' biological origin and evolution and early cultural change.

ANTH 103 - Anthro in a Changing World

Presents the fundamental areas of anthropological analysis through a series of comparative cases that emphasize social and cultural relations in global contexts. Directs attention to the anthropological history of global empires and colonial states, their cultural exchanges, and contemporary studies of culture, society, and globalization. This course can be used to fulfill either Western or non-Western general education categories, but not both.

ANTH 105 - World Archaeology

Using archaeological data, traces our prehistoric heritage and the processes which led to the evolution of agriculture, settled villages, and civilization in many areas of the world. Lectures range from the earliest Homo sapiens to Sumeria, Egypt, Mexico, Peru, and the United States.

ANTH 109 - Religion & Society in West II

Same as PHIL 109, REL 109, and SOC 109. See REL 109.

ANTH 175 - Archaeology and Pop Culture

Examines the ways in which the ancient past has been interpreted, appropriated, represented, used, and misused for a variety of reasons by political parties, national governments, and religious and ethnic groups living in the present.

ANTH 182 - Latin American Cultures

Latin America considered as a theater of conflict and cultural experimentation among Native American, African, and Iberian peoples; their survival and transformation as reported in selected ethnographies and eyewitness sources; and some modern theories and controversies about their experience.

ANTH 199 - Undergraduate Open Seminar

May be repeated.

ANTH 209 - Food, Culture, and Society

Introduces basic anthropological and sociological methods, concepts and approaches to the study of the food. Explores issues including gender roles, religious influences, family relationships, community sharing, nationalist rituals, and global processes in the production, distribution and consumption of food. Film, ethnographies, and other social science studies will be examined. Same as SOC 269.

ANTH 210 - Families in Global Perspective

Same as HDFS 220. See HDFS 220.

ANTH 230 - Sociocultural Anthropology

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary human societies; emphasis on the comparative study of social organization, interpersonal relations, cultural ecology, and processes of sociocultural change, but also includes some consideration of the method and theory of ethnographic field research.

ANTH 240 - Biological Anthropology

Past and present evolution of the human species and population and individual biological variation; topics include genetic principles relevant to human evolution, primate phylogeny and behavior, fossil evidence for human evolution, and the origin and significance of biological diversity in modern humans. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or ANTH 143; or an introductory life sciences course; or consent of instructor.

ANTH 246 - Forensic Science

History and theory underlying methods used in forensic science. Topics include the courtroom, the units of a crime laboratory, methods of securing and investigating a crime scene, and the analysis of evidence collected from a crime scene such as blood, fibers, hair and fingerprints.

ANTH 249 - Evolution and Human Disease

Principles of modern evolutionary theory are applied to medical problems. Topics include: transmission, pathogen strategies, symptoms and spectrum of disease, evolution of virulence, concept of cause, antimicrobial resistance, emerging diseases, stress and adaptation, nutrition, diachronic overview of changing patterns of human disease, and ecological factors.

ANTH 250 - The World Through Museums

Same as MUSE 250. See MUSE 250.

ANTH 270 - Language in Culture

Examines the intersections of culture and language. Topics include the definition of language; the cultural shaping of narrative; how different linguistic systems guide speakers to think differently about the world; and how ideologies about language relate to beliefs about the nation, modernity, race, and gender. Credit is not given for both ANTH 270 and ANTH 271.

ANTH 271 - Language in Culture-ACP

Course is identical to ANTH 270 except for the additional writing component. Credit is not given for both ANTH 271 and ANTH 270. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

ANTH 341 - Native People and Christianity

Same as REL 341. See REL 341.

ANTH 342 - Animal Behavior

Same as ANSC 366 and IB 329. See IB 329.

ANTH 346 - Forensic Anthropology

Analysis of human skeletal remains of the medico-legal profession. Topics include the development of the field of forensic anthropology, biological profile and skeletal trauma analysis, interval since death estimation. Additional topics include investigation of crime scenes, the legal role of the biological anthropologist as an expert witness and case report preparation. Attention will also be drawn to the incorporation of anthropological and ethical approaches to dealing with death and using human remains for research. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 and ANTH 246.

ANTH 358 - People of the Ice Age

Explores a vast period of human prehistory - 2 million to 10,000 years ago - before the first cities arose and before people domesticated plants and animals in the Old World; uses archaeological and paleoanthropological data to understand past life ways as well as reasons for change through time in human adaptation. Prerequisite: ANTH 102.

ANTH 361 - Ecology and Human Health

Same as IB 361. See IB 361.

ANTH 370 - Latina/o Ethnography

Same as LLS 370. See LLS 370.

ANTH 372 - Topics in Lang & Culture

Advanced topics in language and culture. May be repeated in separate terms. Prerequisite: ANTH 104, ANTH 270, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 374 - Anth of Science and Technology

Examination of science as a cultural system. Utilizing ethnographic methods and social theories, the course will locate scientific knowledge, institutions and practices within enduring anthropological questions around rationality and truth, meaning, personhood, sociality, power inequalities, social transformations, and social justice. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTH 390 - Individual Study

Supervised reading and research on anthropological topics chosen by the student with staff approval. Especially (but not exclusively) for students who are preparing for a summer field-work project, or who have some justifiable reason for doing independent study, but who do not qualify for the honors (departmental distinction) courses. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; 12 hours in anthropology; consent of instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ANTH 391 or ANTH 495.

ANTH 399 - Special Topics

Topics are given on a one-time only, experimental basis. Faculty offer special topics in their areas of expertise that provide an opportunity for undergraduates to be exposed to some of the most current developments in faculty research. May be repeated.

ANTH 404 - Disability, Culture & Society

Same as CHLH 407, KIN 407, and REHB 407. See CHLH 407.

ANTH 411 - Research Methods in Socio-Cultural Anthropology

Exploration of qualitative forms of research used by sociocultural anthropologists when conducting field research. Emphasis is on formulating research questions, research design, and application of these ethnographic methods to a substantial research project. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

ANTH 432 - Genes and Behavior

Same as IB 432, NEUR 432, and PSYC 432. See IB 432.

ANTH 444 - Methods in Bioanthropology

Supervised participation in biological anthropology research projects; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual field or laboratory working conditions. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 445. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 or equivalent; consent of instructor.

ANTH 445 - Research in Bioanthropology

Analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and organization of field and laboratory data in biological anthropology; preparation of written reports on research. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 444 or subsequently. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 or equivalent; consent of instructor.

ANTH 454 - Archaeological Field School

Participation in archaeological excavations; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual working conditions. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 455. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 455 - Lab Analysis in Archaeology

Laboratory work including processing, classifying, dating, interpretation, evaluation, and preparation of written reports of archaeological research. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 454 or subsequently. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 459 - The Ancient Maya

Introduction to the Ancient Maya of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. Evaluates theories that account for the rise and fall of Classic (c. A.D. 250-950) Maya rulership. Excavation data, inconography, and inscriptions are used to reconstruct political and social organization, ideology, subsistence activities, and inter-regional interactions. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 105.

ANTH 461 - Hist of Archaeological Theory

Examines the prominent theories in archaeology from its inception to the present day and does so within the context of general developments in anthropological thought. Provides a foundation for graduate students and a capstone for major emphasizing archaeology. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: For undergraduates: ANTH 220; anthropology major with focus on archaeology; senior standing or consent of the instructor. For graduate students: enrollment in ANTH 430 during the same term advised.

ANTH 463 - Religion and Society

Course focuses on theoretical issues raised by religion. Does religion address itself essentially to intellectual, emotional or pragmatic issues? Is religion created by rulers, clerics or worshippers? How does the individual experience religion, and (how) can s/he reshape it? In exploring these and related issues, we will read the writings of German, French, and British social scientists of the past 150 years as well as work by contemporary anthropologists. Theoretical perspectives covered include symbolic, processual, materialist, structural-functionalist, structuralist, and postmodernist approaches. Same as REL 463. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: A 200-level course in cultural anthropology or consent of instructor; or graduate standing.

ANTH 495 - Honors Senior Thesis II

The second of a two-term individual study and research project for those students who are candidates for departmental distinction in anthropology. 2 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: Senior standing; 3.25 GPA in anthropology; and consent of instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ANTH 390.

ANTH 496 - Individual Field Research

Supervised participation in field research in ethnography, ethnology, linguistics, or social anthropology; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual working conditions. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 230; some knowledge of the language of the area concerned; consent of instructor. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 497.

ANTH 497 - Individual Field Data Analysis

Analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and organization of field data in cultural anthropology; preparation of written reports on research in ethnography, ethnology, linguistics, or social anthropology. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 496 or subsequently. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: ANTH 230; some knowledge of the language of the area concerned; consent of instructor.

ANTH 499 - Topics in Anthropology

Research seminar on specialized topics in anthropology. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 515 - Seminar in Anthropology

Analysis of selected topics of special interest in anthropology. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours in the same or subsequent semesters.

ANTH 555 - The Archaeology of Complexity

Examines patterns of behavior archaeologists associate with complex societies and seeks to understand if and how these behaviors generate and/or reflect cultural complexity; theoretical literature and case studies discussed. Major topics include chiefdoms, settlement pattern analysis, and ideology. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing.

ANTH 557 - Social Construction of Space

Consideration of anthropological, archaeological, and related disciplinary perspectives on space, place, landscape, the built environment, and architecture. Coursework encompasses critical review of major theoretical literature and case studies of ancient and modern societies. Same as LA 562. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 565 - Race and Cultural Critique

Same as AAS 561, AFRO 531, GWS 561, and LLS 561. See AAS 561.

ANTH 589 - Readings in Anthropology

Individual guidance in intensive readings in the literature of one or more subdivisions of the field of anthropology, selected in consultation with the adviser in accordance with the needs and interest of the student. May be repeated in the same or separate semesters as topics vary. Prerequisite: One semester of graduate work in anthropology; consent of advisor.

ANTH 590 - Dissertation Readings

Supervised individual investigation or study of a topic not covered by regular courses. The topic selected by the student and the proposed plan of study are approved by the adviser and the staff member who supervises the work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 599 - Thesis Research

Preparation of theses. Approved for S/U grading only.