Currently Offered Courses - Fall 2020

ANTH 101 - Introduction to Anthropology

Anthropology was first envisioned as a holistic discipline, combining insights from the study of human anatomy and evolution, research on material remains of human settlements, and the analysis of social interaction in language and other cultural practices. Following this tradition, this course explores the questions about where humans came from, how societies live and communicate, and why human cultural groups vary.

ANTH 102 - Human Origins and Culture

Explores the origin and evolution of humans with an emphasis on reconstructing and interpreting fossil evidence. It provides an introduction to the fundamentals of biological anthropology and draws on a diverse range of other disciplines that contribute to the study of human evolution – evolutionary biology, population genetics, comparative anatomy, primatology, archaeology, geology and paleoecology. We examine the fossil and artifact record of the last several million years in order to develop an understanding of why we are interesting animals and a somewhat unique species.

ANTH 103 - Anthro in a Changing World

Presents the fundamental areas of anthropological analysis through a series of comparative cases that emphasize social and cultural relations in global contexts. Directs attention to the anthropological history of global empires and colonial states, their cultural exchanges, and contemporary studies of culture, society, and globalization.

ANTH 104 - Talking Culture

Introduction to linguistic anthropology, focusing on the role of language in the creation and maintenance of society and culture and on a person's concept of self within that culture. Demonstrates how language use within a community can serve as the foundation for the analysis of cultural practices. Same as LING 104.

ANTH 108 - Religion & Society in West I

Same as JS 108, PHIL 108, and REL 108. See REL 108.

ANTH 143 - Biology of Human Behavior

Biological anthropology looks at human biology and behavior through the lens of evolutionary biology. However, as human behavior is complex, it cannot be understood independent of culture or the physical environment. We will explore how biology intersects with environmental factors, including culture, to influence human behavior. Students will learn the skills needed to become scientifically literate, learning their place in nature, the importance of the comparative method in learning about ourselves, and the interaction between biology and culture in understanding the human condition. Topics include evolutionary theory and human evolution, primate origins of human behaviors, social and sexual behaviors, aggression, cooperation, and language, cognition, and culture. Same as HDFS 143.

ANTH 199 - Undergraduate Open Seminar

May be repeated.

ANTH 210 - Families in Global Perspective

Same as HDFS 220. See HDFS 220.

ANTH 220 - Introduction to Archaeology

Introduction to the problems of studying past cultures; special attention given to the ranges of techniques available and the adequacy of various methodologies as bases for sound inference about the structure of extinct cultures. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 230 - Sociocultural Anthropology

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary human societies; emphasis on the comparative study of social organization, interpersonal relations, cultural ecology, and processes of sociocultural change, but also includes some consideration of the method and theory of ethnographic field research.

ANTH 241 - Human Biological Variation

Examines the biological concept of race as applied and misapplied to Homo sapiens by anthropologists and others from the 18th century to the present and of the origin, nature, and significance of so-called racial variation.

ANTH 243 - Sociality of the Great Apes

Examines the social organization, mating patterns, and group structure of free-ranging chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. Presents historical perspective focusing on misconceptions that have colored our understanding of ape social behavior; addresses questions concerned with learning potential, food sharing, social cooperation, aggressive behavior, self-awareness, and the appropriateness of the apes as models for understanding human behavior. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, ANTH 143, or an equivalent course in animal behavior; or consent of instructor.

ANTH 246 - Forensic Science

History and theory underlying methods used in forensic science. Topics include the courtroom, the units of a crime laboratory, methods of securing and investigating a crime scene, and the analysis of evidence collected from a crime scene such as blood, fibers, hair and fingerprints.

ANTH 248 - Introduction to Engaged and Public Anthropology

We ask 'How can activist scholars address observable social injustices such as inequality, poverty, and racism? What methods work best to intervene in public and policy debates? What are the implications of such interventions?' We explore the history of anthropological engagements with distinct "publics" as well as influences from other disciplines and forms of activism. These include Latin American Action Research traditions, Indigenous Studies, and Indigenous, Black, and Latinx feminist schools of thought. From these perspectives, we examine contemporary currents and influences inside and outside of the United States.

ANTH 259 - Latina/o Anthropology

In this class, we will examine the contemporary cultures and communities of Latinas and Latinos in the United States. We will focus on recent ethnographic studies on the Latina/o experience written mainly (though not exclusively) by Latinas and Latinos who are active in the academy. Topics to be discussed include: ethnic and racial identity, language, sexuality, power, class hierarchies, cultural citizenship, racialization, gender inequality, cultural citizenship, legal citizenship, immigration, and popular culture—all from an anthropological perspective. In the process, we will critically examine the imagined, the lived, and the invented communities constituting the Latina/o population of this country in the West, Southwest, East Coast, and the Midwest. In particular, we will explore the experiences of Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Central Americans, and Cubans in the United States. Same as LLS 259.

ANTH 262 - Women's Lives

Perceptions of women, their perceptions of themselves, and their varying roles and statuses in several contemporary societies in diverse countries; supervised ethnographic observation of women's behavior. Same as GWS 262.

ANTH 272 - Language and Culture in Turkey

Same as GLBL 272, SAME 272, and TURK 270. See TURK 270.

ANTH 278 - Climate Change & Civilization

Examination of how climate change impacts society. With the increasing need to understand how climate changes and society intersect at present, it is becoming important that we address critical questions about how lessons from the past inform present needs. Case studies from around the world are discussed.

ANTH 279 - Economy, Business & Society

Introduction to anthropological approaches to economics, capitalism, and the world of business. We discuss these topics as influential cultural ideals in U.S. society, consider critical alternative approaches, and examine a range of specific business and related economic practices drawing upon case studies from the U.S. as well as international and cross-cultural contexts.

ANTH 343 - Behavior and Biology of Women

Exploration of female biology and behavior in a broad evolutionary context. Explores development from pre-puberty through menopause, reproductive processes such as pregnancy, birth and lactation, cognitive and behavioral sex differences, and male and female reproductive strategies in a variety of cultural settings. Examples are drawn primarily from traditional and modern human societies as well as field and experimental data from other species, particularly non-human primates. Prerequisite: ANTH 143 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 347 - Human Osteology

Comprehensive knowledge of the human skeleton is central to reconstructing the anatomy, demography, health and evolution of past populations because most of our evidence is derived from preserved skeletal and dental remains. The primary goal of this course is the identification of isolated and fragmentary skeletal remains given that this is a prerequisite to all subsequent analysis. In addition to identifying the bones and landmarks of the human skeleton, students will learn about the structure and function of bone, understand the growth and development of the human skeleton and be introduced to analytical techniques used in human osteology including paleopathology, paleodemography and forensics. Prerequisite: ANTH 240.

ANTH 360 - Evolution and Human Health

Same as IB 360. See IB 360.

ANTH 372 - Topics in Lang & Culture

Advanced topics in language and culture. May be repeated in separate terms. Prerequisite: ANTH 104, ANTH 270, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 379 - Medical Anthropology

Introduction to concepts and social aspects of health, illness, and curing in different cultures. Considers concepts of interaction between folk and modern medicine in developing nations and delivery of health care as an international social problem. Prerequisite: ANTH 230 or ANTH 260, or consent of instructor.

ANTH 390 - Individual Study

Supervised reading and research on anthropological topics chosen by the student with staff approval. Especially (but not exclusively) for students who are preparing for a summer field-work project, or who have some justifiable reason for doing independent study, but who do not qualify for the honors (departmental distinction) courses. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; 12 hours in anthropology; consent of instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ANTH 391 or ANTH 495.

ANTH 399 - Special Topics

Topics are given on a one-time only, experimental basis. Faculty offer special topics in their areas of expertise that provide an opportunity for undergraduates to be exposed to some of the most current developments in faculty research. May be repeated.

ANTH 407 - Evolutionary Immunology

Immune systems are a defense mechanism against microbial assault and dying and cancerous cells. They are under tremendous evolutionary pressure to cope with changing invasions and other stresses and have, therefore, evolved differently across species and populations. The resulting immune variation strongly impacts human and animal health. This seminar addresses animal immune system physiology and function in the context of evolutionary and anthropological theory and research. It is designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a basic background in biology, biological anthropology and related fields. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.

ANTH 438 - Primate Life History Evolution

Life history seeks to explain why differences exist in the pathways that organisms follow from conception to death. Examination of the diversity in the evolution of primate (including human) life histories. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 102, ANTH 143, ANTH 240, ANTH 243 or equivalent.

ANTH 441 - Human Genetics

Principles of human genetics; anthropological aspects of race and race formation; and hereditary and environmental factors in the biological variation of modern humans. Same as ANSC 441. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or equivalent.

ANTH 444 - Methods in Bioanthropology

Supervised participation in biological anthropology research projects; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual field or laboratory working conditions. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 445. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 or equivalent; consent of instructor.

ANTH 445 - Research in Bioanthropology

Analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and organization of field and laboratory data in biological anthropology; preparation of written reports on research. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 444 or subsequently. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 240 or equivalent; consent of instructor.

ANTH 448 - The Prehistory of Africa

The study of cultural development in Africa from the appearance of hominids to the time of European domination. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 220 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 453 - Landscape Archaeology

The use of archaeological, documentary, and oral history evidence to study and interpret the ways past peoples shaped their landscapes through the deployment of cultural and social practices, and the ways, in turn, that such people were influenced, motivated, or constrained by their natural surroundings. Same as LA 454. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Introductory archaeology course, such as ANTH 220, or introductory landscape architecture course, or equivalent with instructor's permission.

ANTH 454 - Archaeological Field School

Participation in archaeological excavations; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual working conditions. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 455. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 455 - Lab Analysis in Archaeology

Laboratory work including processing, classifying, dating, interpretation, evaluation, and preparation of written reports of archaeological research. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 454 or subsequently. Additional fees may apply. See Class Schedule. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated in separate semesters, if topics vary. Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of instructor.

ANTH 459 - The Ancient Maya

Introduction to the Ancient Maya of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. Evaluates theories that account for the rise and fall of Classic (c. A.D. 250-950) Maya rulership. Excavation data, inconography, and inscriptions are used to reconstruct political and social organization, ideology, subsistence activities, and inter-regional interactions. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ANTH 105.

ANTH 461 - Hist of Archaeological Theory

Examines the prominent theories in archaeology from its inception to the present day and does so within the context of general developments in anthropological thought. Provides a foundation for graduate students and a capstone for major emphasizing archaeology. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: For undergraduates: ANTH 220; anthropology major with focus on archaeology; senior standing or consent of the instructor. For graduate students: enrollment in ANTH 430 during the same term advised.

ANTH 494 - Honors Senior Thesis I

The first of a two-term individual study and research project for those students who are candidates for departmental distinction in anthropology. 2 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: Senior standing; 3.25 GPA in anthropology; and consent of instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ANTH 390.

ANTH 495 - Honors Senior Thesis II

The second of a two-term individual study and research project for those students who are candidates for departmental distinction in anthropology. 2 to 4 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: Senior standing; 3.25 GPA in anthropology; and consent of instructor. May not be taken concurrently with ANTH 390.

ANTH 496 - Individual Field Research

Supervised participation in field research in ethnography, ethnology, linguistics, or social anthropology; techniques, methods, and procedures discussed and practiced under actual working conditions. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Usually offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: ANTH 230; some knowledge of the language of the area concerned; consent of instructor. Normally taken concurrently with ANTH 497.

ANTH 497 - Individual Field Data Analysis

Analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and organization of field data in cultural anthropology; preparation of written reports on research in ethnography, ethnology, linguistics, or social anthropology. May be taken concurrently with ANTH 496 or subsequently. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: ANTH 230; some knowledge of the language of the area concerned; consent of instructor.

ANTH 498 - Senior Capstone Seminar

A guided independent research seminar for Anthropology majors normally taken during the Fall of the senior year. Students may select to conduct significant and original research in any of the four sub-fields of anthropology or combine interdisciplinary interests. Working closely with the course instructors and with additional guidance from a chosen anthropology faculty advisor, student will develop a research topic of their choice, identify significant research questions, before collecting and analyzing their field data. 3 undergraduate hours. No graduate credit.

ANTH 499 - Topics in Anthropology

Research seminar on specialized topics in anthropology. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 511 - Research Proposal Seminar

This seminar guides graduate students in designing a doctoral research project and writing a grant proposal. Focus is on developing a cogent theoretical framework, articulating significance of the project, identifying appropriate research methods, and considering ethical issues. Seminar format allows regular feedback from peers to clarify and hone ideas. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in anthropology or consent of instructor.

ANTH 514 - Seminar in Cognitive Science

Same as PSYC 514, CS 549, EPSY 551, LING 570, PHIL 514. See PSYC 514.

ANTH 515 - Seminar in Anthropology

Analysis of selected topics of special interest in anthropology. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours in the same or subsequent semesters.

ANTH 589 - Readings in Anthropology

Individual guidance in intensive readings in the literature of one or more subdivisions of the field of anthropology, selected in consultation with the adviser in accordance with the needs and interest of the student. May be repeated in the same or separate semesters as topics vary. Prerequisite: One semester of graduate work in anthropology; consent of advisor.

ANTH 590 - Dissertation Readings

Supervised individual investigation or study of a topic not covered by regular courses. The topic selected by the student and the proposed plan of study are approved by the adviser and the staff member who supervises the work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ANTH 599 - Thesis Research

Preparation of theses. Approved for S/U grading only.